Celebrating Black History Month, Remembering the Past

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Celebrating Black History Month, Remembering the Past

Beth Gordon

Beth Gordon

Beth Gordon

Zoe Boswinkle, Reporter

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Every February, we celebrate Black History Month, reminding us of the important role African Americans have played in our history. Since February 10, 1976 Black History Month existed in the United States. Carter G. Woodson, also known as the father of Black History, advocated for awareness of African-American history. He helped to start the predecessor to Black History Month,  Negro History week, which was chosen to take place in February for many reasons. On February 3, 1870, African-Americans gained the right to vote. The second week of February also coincides with Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas’s birthday. Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation ended slavery in 1863, while Frederick Douglas was a former slave who started a movement for equality. These two figures did a great deal to help improve African-American rights, making February the perfect month to celebrate Black History.

According to AfricanAmericanHistoryMonth.gov “In 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration.” African-Americans were finally get recognition for their role in our history and their achievements.

Black History Month is a way for African-Americans to be proud of their history. “To me, it means the black community has come a long way and we worked hard to get what we have today, ” said freshman Julian Sickles.

“African-Americans went through a lot in the past, and we should be proud of what we have earned today,” freshman Arsenio Nason.

At GHS, students have the option to participate in an essay contest about Martin Luther King Jr. The students get to learn about an important figure in our history while also having an opportunity to benefit their education.

Black History Month is a way for everyone to remember our past and important figures in our history like Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Maya Angelou, and so many more. African-Americans are able to be proud of how far they have come and be proud of the achievements their ancestors have made that make it possible to be free today. This February, we can be spend our time learning about our past and how African-Americans contributed to making America free.